macadamia

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The macadamia tree is usually propagated by grafting, and does not begin to produce commercial quantities of seeds until it is 2–3years old, but once established, may continue bearing for over 100 years. Macadamias prefer fertile, well-drained soils, a rainfall of 1,000–2,000 mm (40–80 in), and temperatures not falling below 10 °C (50 °F) (although once established, they can withstand light frosts), with an optimum temperature of 25 °C (80 °F). The roots are shallow and trees can be blown down in storms; they are also susceptible to Phytophthora root disease.

The seeds (nuts) are a valuable food crop.

 

In a 100-gram amount, macadamia nuts provide 740 Calories and are a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of numerous essential nutrients, including thiamin (104% DV), vitamin B6 (21% DV), manganese (195% DV), iron (28% DV), magnesium (37% DV), and phosphorus (27% DV) (table). Macadamia nuts are 76% fat, 14% carbohydrates, including 9% dietary fiber, and 8% protein (table).

Besides being a food source, the husks are composted for mulch or for fertilizer,  the oil is used in the cosmetic industry to make soaps, shampoos, and sunscreens. The remainder can be used in animal feed. Macadamias are a tough nut to crack, as the saying goes. Containing at least 72 percent oil, they’re encased in a leathery, green husk that splits open as the nut matures. Harvest comes when they fall from the tree, which is when the husk is removed and the nuts are dried. The shell can then be removed using a nutcracker. A handful of these nuts makes a crunchy snack, but they’re also great in cookies, breads and pastries, fruit salads, and garden salads.

Compared with other common edible nuts, such as almonds and cashews, macadamias are high in total fat and relatively low in protein (table). They have a high amount of monounsaturated fats (59% of total content, table) and contain, as 17% of total fat, the monounsaturated fat, omega-7 palmitoleic acid.

NB: macadamia trees can reach 40 feet in horizontal as well as vertical spread. A 10-year-old macadamia tree might produce up to 50 pounds and increase indefinitely.

Health Benefits of Macadamia Nuts

 

As a natural, whole food, macadamia nuts, specifically, contain antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals with significant health-boosting potential. They contain high amounts of vitamin B1 and magnesium, and just one serving nets 58 percent of what you need in manganese and 23 percent of the recommended daily value of thiamin.

 

Raw nuts contain a number of nutrients along with a healthy amount of monounsaturated fat. Macadamias, with their own unique nutritional profile, are relatively low in carbs and protein (containing two percent per one-ounce serving), high in oleic acid and omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acid, the same fatty acid found in olive oil. In fact, of the 21 grams of fat found in macadamia nuts, only three grams are saturated fat.

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Description

The macadamia tree is usually propagated by grafting, and does not begin to produce commercial quantities of seeds until it is 2–3years old, but once established, may continue bearing for over 100 years. Macadamias prefer fertile, well-drained soils, a rainfall of 1,000–2,000 mm (40–80 in), and temperatures not falling below 10 °C (50 °F) (although once established, they can withstand light frosts), with an optimum temperature of 25 °C (80 °F). The roots are shallow and trees can be blown down in storms; they are also susceptible to Phytophthora root disease.

The seeds (nuts) are a valuable food crop.

In a 100-gram amount, macadamia nuts provide 740 Calories and are a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of numerous essential nutrients, including thiamin (104% DV), vitamin B6 (21% DV), manganese (195% DV), iron (28% DV), magnesium (37% DV), and phosphorus (27% DV) (table). Macadamia nuts are 76% fat, 14% carbohydrates, including 9% dietary fiber, and 8% protein (table).

Besides being a food source, the husks are composted for mulch or for fertilizer,  the oil is used in the cosmetic industry to make soaps, shampoos, and sunscreens. The remainder can be used in animal feed. Macadamias are a tough nut to crack, as the saying goes. Containing at least 72 percent oil, they’re encased in a leathery, green husk that splits open as the nut matures. Harvest comes when they fall from the tree, which is when the husk is removed and the nuts are dried. The shell can then be removed using a nutcracker. A handful of these nuts makes a crunchy snack, but they’re also great in cookies, breads and pastries, fruit salads, and garden salads.

Compared with other common edible nuts, such as almonds and cashews, macadamias are high in total fat and relatively low in protein (table). They have a high amount of monounsaturated fats (59% of total content, table) and contain, as 17% of total fat, the monounsaturated fat, omega-7 palmitoleic acid.

NB: macadamia trees can reach 40 feet in horizontal as well as vertical spread. A 10-year-old macadamia tree might produce up to 50 pounds and increase indefinitely.

Health Benefits of Macadamia Nuts

As a natural, whole food, macadamia nuts, specifically, contain antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals with significant health-boosting potential. They contain high amounts of vitamin B1 and magnesium, and just one serving nets 58 percent of what you need in manganese and 23 percent of the recommended daily value of thiamin.

Raw nuts contain a number of nutrients along with a healthy amount of monounsaturated fat. Macadamias, with their own unique nutritional profile, are relatively low in carbs and protein (containing two percent per one-ounce serving), high in oleic acid and omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acid, the same fatty acid found in olive oil. In fact, of the 21 grams of fat found in macadamia nuts, only three grams are saturated fat.

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